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Love and desire at any age.

Perhaps passion and excitement were meant to be secondary to a stable adult life.

EROTIC STORIES FOR PUNJABI WIDOWS

The book:

Today’s review comes to you courtesy of a Buzzfeed list called 13 Books To Read After Crazy Rich Asians. Y’all know I devoured CRA, so I dived right into this list (bonus points for the list’s first entry!). With a growing number of Indian and British friends, I was intrigued by the intersection present within Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows (2017). As well, the author is Singaporean so she has a similar outsider perspective as myself.

As well, what red-blooded woman isn’t tickled by a title like this? Widows are so often marginalized in society; even more so in Sikh society as I learned. With their husbands gone, how could they possibly feel passion? In a country where they don’t speak or write much of the language, how can they broach these repressed feelings? Religious law mandates much of their public life, but what about in private?

Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows book cover
Amazon book cover (2017)

Spoiler: Yes, the widows’ stories are most definitely erotic. I’ve never read that gray-tinged book, and while this is milder (and better written) than that, it’s definitely still steamy. But often hilarious, too.

The author:

Though born in Singapore, Balli Kuar Jaswal has lived on three continents during her life. Due to her time in Australia, her first novel won the Sydney Morning Herald‘s Best Young Young Australian Novelist Award in 2014. The inspiration for her third novel came from her time spent in Southall, as well as her family roots in Punjab. Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows was released to international acclaim in 2017.

Translation:

While this novel was written originally in English, it was optioned for translation in 11 countries and languages. As well, throughout the book, characters switch between Punjabi and English—with varying degrees of success. Some terms are kept in the original language as well, which really helped keep me in the setting.

‘Sat sri akal. Sorry I’m late.’

‘Hanh, yes, yes, but it’s all water under the tables now,’ she said, pleased to have remembered an English idiom.

EROTIC STORIES FOR PUNJABI WIDOWS
Map of Punjab region of India
Punjab region of India and interior state

What I loved:

The cultural struggle. I really enjoy reading about people that have incredibly different lives from me. I’m fully white and a 5th generation Texan. No one in my family has ever struggled to adapt to a new country or culture (except when I travel, of course). Nikki’s struggle to reconcile her Punjabi family foundation with her daily British life, especially as she spent more time with widows, was fascinating. She couldn’t deny her history but didn’t want to be trapped.

Spoiler: Nikki was able to find her future by embracing both sides of herself, predictably but still satisfying. Working with the women, embracing their language and bringing them into an open and sexually aware modern world brought passion and acceptance into all their lives.

Through the windows of the connecting bus to the temple, the sight of more bilingual signs on shop fronts gave Nikki a slight headache and the sensation of being split in two parts. British, Indian.

EROTIC STORIES FOR PUNJABI WIDOWS

‘American,’ Jason said. ‘And Punjabi. And Sikh, obviously.’ He gestured at the temple. ‘And yourself? ‘British and Punjabi and Sikh,’ Nikki said. It had been a long time since she had identified herself in all of those terms at once.

EROTIC STORIES FOR PUNJABI WIDOWS
Southall, London neighborhood circled in West London
Location of Southall in London, UK

The language issues. As I’ve mentioned in previous blog posts, I am always delighted by language issues that become plot points within my books. It’s just so meta! In this case, the widows are illiterate (some in English and Punjabi) and most only speak Punjabi and struggle to express their stories. On the other hand, Nikki has a limited vocabulary in Punjabi, but has a nearly complete legal degree. No one was perfect!

Nikki was still talking. She spoke Punjabi with less confidence, peppering her sentences with English words. ‘…and it’s my belief that everyone has stories to telling. It would be such a rewarding experience to help Punjabi women to crafting their stories and compile them into a book.’

EROTIC STORIES FOR PUNJABI WIDOWS

“Tell me, why haven’t I picked up English? Because of the English.’ She said this triumphantly. ‘They haven’t made their country or their customs friendly to me. Now their language is just as unfriendly with their Ahh-Oooh sounds.’

EROTIC STORIES FOR PUNJABI WIDOWS

The sly humor. Between Nikki’s sarcasm going over the widows’ heads, Jason’s flirtatious jokes and the widows’ own sly humor, this book was really fun. Besides passion, I think humor was also sorely lacking in the lives of these widows. As well, the author’s experience with Punjabi culture helped flavor the story with dark commentary humor.

‘When I decide to get married, Bibi Manjeet, you’ll be the first to know,’ Nikki replied. ‘Don’t do that’, Arvinder said with a frown. ‘Tell your family first.’

EROTIC STORIES FOR PUNJABI WIDOWS

It would be easier to be a criminal prosecuted by the law than an Indian daughter who wronged her family. A crime would be punishable by a jail sentence of definite duration rather than this uncertain length of family guilt trips.

EROTIC STORIES FOR PUNJABI WIDOWS

‘At least you get to know the person before marrying him. You can separate the idiots from the bloody idiots.’

EROTIC STORIES FOR PUNJABI WIDOWS

‘I didn’t hear a word of that because I’m thinking about my grandmother making sex-roti,’ Jason said with a grimace. ‘Bum bread,’ Nikki said. ‘Tushy toast,’ Jason laughed.

EROTIC STORIES FOR PUNJABI WIDOWS

What I liked:

The feminism. In the Punjabi culture, men and women practice strict separation in the gurdwara, especially from older widows. Therefore, the women in Nikki’s class have to carve out new methods of expression and creativity. They never think of themselves as lesser than men—if anything they are more flexible, communicative and dedicated.

Gurdwara Sri Guru Singh Sabha in Southall, London
Gurdwara Sri Guru Singh Sabha

Spoiler: Eventually, their erotic stories are passed from woman to woman throughout London’s Indian community, inspiring men and women to renewed passion. Kulwinder is also given a promotion and new office due to her success with the program.

Her purpose came into sharp focus. ‘Some people don’t even know about this place,’ she would say. ‘Let’s change that.’ Fiery-eyed and indignant, they would pen their stories for the whole world to read.

EROTIC STORIES FOR PUNJABI WIDOWS

‘We’d be invisible in India,’ Arvinder said. ‘I suppose it makes no difference that we’re in England. You must think it’s wrong of us to discuss these things because we shouldn’t be thinking of them.’

EROTIC STORIES FOR PUNJABI WIDOWS

‘These storytelling sessions are good fun but I think I’ve also learned to speak up for what I want. Exactly what I want.’

EROTIC STORIES FOR PUNJABI WIDOWS

The characterization. Due to their lively dialogue and passionate stories, I had trouble distinguishing between the “young” old widows and the truly old widows. The sign of a good author is demonstrating that so many traits are universal across age and religion. We all crave love and companionship. For some of the widows, they had to sacrifice for their daughters.

‘I gave you all the happiness I couldn’t have. You loved your husband, your marriage. Good for you, I survived mine.’

EROTIC STORIES FOR PUNJABI WIDOWS

What I could do without:

The mystery. Honestly I was more interested by the personal interplay and cultural conflict, even Nikki’s romance. The mystery of Maya’s death, Tarampal’s connection, and the Brothers’ power trip were just distractions from the main fun. Yes, the widows’ stories were tantalizing, but their journey to creative freedom was even more exciting.

The recommendation:

Reese Witherspoon reading Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows
Reese Witherspoon reading the novel!

If you have read nothing else in this post, read this: Reese Witherspoon added Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows to her book club in March of 2018! This is a woman that’s friends with Oprah. Remember the Oprah Effect?

If you do still care what I think, I recommend not only reading this book but passing it on to a boyfriend/husband/partner. It’s important for couples to know both sides of the coin. 5* on Amazon y’all! You should also read it soon because the film rights have already been snapped up. Let me know in the comments: who do you think should play Nikki?

Featured

Crime is confusing in any language.

She attempted a little smile but was obviously not in the habit because it didn’t work.

THE SCARRED WOMAN

The book:

We return now to my work (and only) book club with a fellow member’s unusual pick: The Scarred Woman (Department Q, #7, 2017). I actually physically checked this book out of a library, after doing a little research to ensure I could follow the story without reading the previous six books. Mysteries and thrillers aren’t usually my cup of tea, as you’ll have noticed from the romances and historical fiction clogging this blog, but I’m down for a challenge. After all, this blog was also born out of a desire to expand my reading horizons, and trying an unfamiliar genre translated from an unfamiliar language is a pretty big leap.

Spoiler: Unlike my last review, the meaning behind this title continues to elude me. Unless we’re talking emotional scars, none of the female characters in this book fit the description. I’m skeptical on the scarring being metaphorical because I really don’t have that level of faith in the author’s use of subtlety. But more on that later.

The book’s hardback cover

I’ve traveled around Europe a few times, but haven’t yet made my way up to Scandinavia. After reading this book, I don’t think I’ll be rushing to make the trip up north anytime soon. Yes, I know that crime novels have a skewed perspective, but the picture this story paints isn’t a pretty one. For one of the most socially developed countries in the world, Denmark’s thick social safety net seems to have a gaping hole for the lazy and incompetent. As I’ll explain in more detail during this blog post, I was distracted from most of the mystery plot by the strange translation work. I didn’t become interested in the different mystery threads until more than halfway through the book–if it wasn’t for my book club or this blog, I wouldn’t have bothered to finish the story.

Spoiler: While this book certainly made sense without reading the previous six, one of the more compelling plot lines fell flat without more background. The character of Rose spends the entire book having a destructive mental breakdown as she relives past trauma. As well, Carl’s romantic and friendship histories are full of side characters (Mona, Hardy, Morten) with their own confusing sob stories that take up valuable page real estate.

The author:

Denmark’s #1 crime author Carl Valdemar Henry Jussi Adler-Olsen is the son of a chief psychiatrist and a native of Copenhagen. He spent his childhood with his family in doctors’ official residences at several mental hospitals across Denmark. Adler-Olsen’s novels have been sold in more than 40 languages. Outside Denmark he has enjoyed particular success in Norway, Germany and the Netherlands being a frequent visitor on the top of the bestseller lists. 

Translation:

As an interesting bookend to my last book’s flawless translation, William Frost’s work leaves much to be desired. Of course, with any literary translation, we must consider the source material. Though, interestingly enough, Danes are ranked as the third-best non-native English speakers. So all the problems may not be laid at Frost’s feet. Also, this book was originally published in Danish as Selfies in 2016.

Are Danish crime novels always filled with step-by-step actions? Are descriptions filled with adjectives and cliches? I did read one other review that bemoaned Frost’s stilted translation of another Department Q novel, so it may be a trend. As noted in the author section, Adler-Olsen is most popular in Northern European countries, so there must be a cultural divide in literary styles.

The Danish cover of Selfies (2016)

What I loved:

Honestly, I found nothing to love about this novel. There were a few mildly amusing parts, but overall I couldn’t connect with the characters, the mystery, or Danish society as a whole. Maybe I need to eat my first Danish pastry to really connect…though the characters didn’t eat much, just drank red wine.

What I liked:

The disdain. In my limited experience, crime novels are distinguished by their pointed disgust. Whether it’s for an activity, person or place, something is always going wrong and fixated upon. In this book, the main villain, Anne-Line (Anneli) Svendsen, is fed up with the young women gaming the welfare system. While she has a point, obviously her kill-them-all solution is incredibly wrong.

Anneli: The majority of people who came to this center were people she wasn’t overly keen on.

THE SCARRED WOMAN

Anneli: “You just can’t find fault with those girls. Everything matches: bags, shoes, clothes. It’s all bling, bling, bling!”

Anneli, THE SCARRED WOMAN

Anneli: But when she thought about the thousands of hours these parasitic girls had spent on making fools of her and the system, wasn’t it about time and good for everyone that someone finally took action?

THE SCARRED WOMAN

What I could do without:

The cliches. While this book was already translated from Danish to English, one of the members of Department Q takes it a step further. Assad is still learning Danish from his native language of Arabic, and Carl is constantly correcting his use of idioms and cliches.

Spoiler: Assad is hiding something, as he occasionally speaks perfect Danish, and he eventually snaps at Carl for his constant correction interruptions.

“Yeah, but it still wasn’t very clever, Carl. I can scent that she’s not happy.”

Carl looked at him with confusion. “Scent! You mean ‘sense,’ don’t you, Assad? Scent is something else.”

THE SCARRED WOMAN

“What’s up with Gordon, Carl?” asked Assad a few seconds later. “He looks like cold death.”

Carl shook his head. “Death warmed over, Assad. The phrase is ‘death warmed over.'”

THE SCARRED WOMAN

“How? Are you going to stroke him the wrong way?”

“You mean rub him the wrong way, Assad.” Carl smiled.

THE SCARRED WOMAN
Map of Copenhagen, Denmark

The details. Strangely enough, I do understand Anneli’s motivations for wanting to get rid of the welfare women. The ones we meet are milking the system to buy makeup, haircuts, and fashionable clothes. On the other hand, the police are shown as a diversity lineup described by a casting director and appear just as strange.

Michelle: Wasn’t it precisely at this angle that the hotspots–a woman’s eyelashes and pupils–best caught the attention of those around her?

THE SCARRED WOMAN

The short, squat, and dark Assad, with masculinity oozing from his jet-black stubble, standing next to Gordon, looking pale and as tall as a giraffe in comparison, and who was still waiting for his first real shave.

THE SCARRED WOMAN

The lack of subtlety. As I mentioned at the start of this post, Adler-Olsen truly lacks subtlety. I don’t speak a lick of Danish, but I have to believe it is a language without nuance based on the plots and descriptions in this book.
The author shoves his villain’s motivation down the reader’s throat by highlighting the moral-less nature of modern Danish society. A good author lets users use their imagination.

Michelle: “I didn’t like him bleeding from his head. Why did you do it? He was already unconscious.”

Jazmine: “I was raised badly,” she offered.

They looked at one another for a moment and then Michelle started to laugh. “Selfies!” she shouted and pulled out her phone.

Denise smiled.

THE SCARRED WOMAN

It was deadly quiet in the S-train car because almost all the passengers were surfing on their smartphones and iPads. Some were enthusiastic and concentrated, while others were just scrolling their thumbs over the screen in the desperate hope for some form of contact.

THE SCARRED WOMAN

The recommendation:

While I had plenty to talk about at my book club meeting, I’m not very excited about the content. All of the “good” characters were either racist or had anger issues, while the “bad” characters were lazy and deceitful.

If you really feel like diving into the dark side of Copenhagen society, I recommend starting with the first book. The translators trade the baton every few books, and maybe you will actually care about the characters starting from the beginning. I gave this book 2* on Amazon/Goodreads.

Spoiler: The book’s prologue definitely played out at the end of the novel, when the father is shown to be mostly alive, and completely twisted. The Zimmerman/Frank family had no good seeds. It was really lucky for Department Q and the rest of the Copenhagen police that Anneli decided to start knocking of welfare women so they could tie together all their outstanding cases with one rotten family. Wonderfully convenient.

Comment below if you thought this was a good representation of the mystery genre, or if you have any recommendations to cleanse my palate.

UK book cover
Featured

Woman of many names.

For if you no longer have a future, what else is there left but dreams of the past?

AMERICAN PRINCESS

The book:

Today’s review of An American Princess: The Many Lives of Allene Tew (2015) was born out of a combination of my lifelong fascination with royalty and the variety of books on KindleUnlimited. Despite my avowed feminism as an adult, much of my childhood was spent watching movies and reading books about princesses. If I’d only read this book first, I’d have known just how much work went into obtaining a title!

Spoiler: Despite the title, this book is strongly rooted in the history of the Netherlands. The continuation of the Dutch royal line was assured thanks to the patronage and machinations of Allene Tew, in one of her many incarnations. From her humble beginnings in Jamestown, NY to her death in Castel Mare on the coast of France, Allene sure made an impact.

Amazon book cover (2018)

As a young woman of modest means in the 1890s, Allen knew that she could only advance in life with a husband. At least at the start. Five husbands later, Allene had homes, connections, material holdings, adoptive family members and a royal title across at least two continents. And yet, I’d never heard her name until opening this book. For a young country, we sure have a lot of undiscovered history.

The author:

One of the Netherlands’ most well-known authors, Annejet van der Zijl was first published in 1998. Though she began as a crime and arts journalist, she has made her mark in long-form narrative nonfiction. Her 2015 tracing of Allene Tew’s life, an American that became godmother to Dutch Queen Beatrix, was a #1 bestseller in the Netherlands. The English translation of the book reached #5 on the Wall Street Journal’s nonfiction list.

Translation:

One of the most flawless translations yet was completed by Michele Hutchison formerly of the UK. A veteran of the publishing world, Michele has lived in Amsterdam since 2004. She was educated at UEA, Cambridge, and Lyon universities. She translates Dutch literary fiction and nonfiction, poetry, graphic novels, and children’s books. Beyond translations, Michele is a coauthor, with Rina Mae Acosta, of The Happiest Kids in the World: How Dutch Parents Help Their Kids (and Themselves) by Doing Less (The Experiment, 2017).

Original 2015 Dutch release

What I loved:

The pragmatism. For most of my life, I was bored by American history for the lack of meat, twists and turns. However, with Allene Tew’s story I was exposed to the many layers and complications that created the United States. Allene’s story began before the Gilded Age, survived the Great Depression, hit some rough patches during the first World War and petered out after the second World War.

The Americans, who had been dependent on Europe for many of their resources before the Civil War, now began to export products back to the Old World at competitive prices.

AN AMERICAN PRINCESS

Clearly a child of the nineteenth century, Allene hadn’t yet been infected with the modern idea that grief was a thing that needed to be processed or could even be healed, preferably by talking a lot.

AN AMERICAN PRINCESS

The Second World War was a remarkably tranquil period in Allene’s otherwise stormy life–even if it was only because the war forced her to stay in her own country without interruption for the first time in decades.

AN AMERICAN PRINCESS

The commentary. Since this isn’t just a history book, but narrative nonfiction, Annejet was able to inject her own humorous commentary on the subject’s life and life choices. Allene was raised in Victorian morals, yet lived her life in defiance of this strictures. And very few time periods were as strict and judgmental as the Victorians.

She longed for pleasure, for adventure, and particularly for a world that was larger than the essentially small-town Jamestown. In short, Allene Tew had everything anyone might need to get into trouble. And that is what she did.

AN AMERICAN PRINCESS

According to the article, the house resembled a gigantic log cabin, once more showing that Allene wasn’t ashamed of her roots.

AN AMERICAN PRINCESS

She was a fanatical horse lover and an avid smoker and was renowned for not giving a damn.

AN AMERICAN PRINCESS

What I liked:

The dedication. One of the keys to survival, as noted often throughout this book, is adaptability. Yes, Allene always managed to maintain some semblance of wealth and comfort, but her staying power came from rolling with the punches. She made friends, bought property, and maintained her cool. Oh, and she picked up a new husband when it suited her.

And if there was one thing that was truly American, it was the belief that it was always possible to start again.

AN AMERICAN PRINCESS

Weren’t almost all of the marriages between British aristocrats and American heirs or heiresses based on dollars?

AN AMERICAN PRINCESS

In fact, Allene’s only concession to her age was the fact that she released herself from the self-imposed obligation to stay slim at any cost.

AN AMERICAN PRINCESS
Allen’s marriage history from An American Princess

The characterization. the list of research resources that Annejet combed through to create this book could have constituted a final chapter in of themselves. Her ability to create an interesting, well-rounded and lifelike main character from letters, historical records and property deeds is very impressive. Allene shines through as a determined, yet passionate woman.

Perhaps, this was Allene’s greatest achievement, above her wealth, her titles, her many houses, and her impressive guest book: that despite everything she’d experienced and endured, she always clung to her ability to enjoy life and be grateful for it.

AN AMERICAN PRINCESS

Allene had been and remained the Queen of Loose Ends. Every time a hole developed in the fabric of her life, she’d tie together the loose ends and get on with it.

AN AMERICAN PRINCESS
Castel Mare’s Blue Room, Allene’s final home

What I could do without:

The morals. As I mentioned previously, Allene’s life was shaped by her Victorian upbringing. Women should be seen and not heard and defer to their husbands, education was secondary to wealth and homosexuality was a sin. Furthermore, until the reading of Allene’s will, there was no mention of any servants or caretakers–did she run this crazy life on her own? While the US is said to have maintained a Puritanical outlook, this Dutch author managed to glaze over gritty parts of Allene’s past where it suited her. Commentary is one thing, but a true history should leave no stone unturned and making Allene’s kind of money was messy.

Many a young woman in Allene’s position ended her life to spare herself and her family a scandal. Young men such as Tod, in turn, usually withdrew from girlfriends who had been so stupid and wanton as to let this happen.

AN AMERICAN PRINCESS

Not only were both gentlemen of “dubious sexual orientation,” they had backgrounds that, in those years of the Cold War and witch hunting of Communists, made alarm bells ring.

AN AMERICAN PRINCESS

The recommendation:

It’s always a good idea to learn more about your own history, even if it’s from an outside perspective. As you read through the many stages of Allene’s life, it’s easy to lose track of places, names and events. The author made a point to not use footnotes. Otherwise, half of each page would have been taken up with citations.

Read the book, but maybe keep Google handy as backup. I’m always intrigued by tales of strong women, even if I’m frustrated by historical women’s persistence in marrying over and over again. Let me know in the comments: was she a survivor or an opportunist?

Boy of many voices.

It’s the Tower of Babel in South Africa. Every single day. Every day you see people completely lost, trying to have conversations and having no idea what the other person is saying.

BORN A CRIME

The book:

Today’s review of Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood (2016) is the first one out of a friend’s book recommendation. While I’ve been a fan of Trevor Noah for years now, I had never gotten around to reading his award-winning book. The co-creator of my office book club suggested it for its great humor and earthy honesty.

The really cool thing about Trevor’s book is that much of his life revolved around his use of language to bridge racial divides. Most of these divides stem from the laws of apartheid that separated races and combined South African tribes in small spaces, forcing them to co-exist.

Spoiler: Not really a spoiler, but Trevor has gone onto an illustrious career as a correspondent and now the first African host of The Daily Show. A 2011 documentary about his first one-man comedy show in Johannesburg titled “You Laugh But It’s True” is a great follow-up to this book.

The endearing cover of the book as a billboard

The author:

A native of Johannesburg (specifically Soweto Township), Trevor Noah was born near the end of the apartheid era of South Africa. Raised by his staunchly independent Xhosa mother, as it was illegal to be seen with his Swiss father, Trevor speaks eight languages. A latecomer to comedy, Trevor fell into the profession on a dare in 2002. He currently hosts The Daily Show through 2022.

Translation:

As mentioned previously, Trevor speaks eight languages including: English, Xhosa, German, Zulu, Sotho, Tswana, Tsonga, and Afrikaans. Throughout the book are phrases in these different languages. Additionally, South Africans are known to have a distinctive, repetitive speaking style that Trevor still exhibits today during his show and stand-up specials.

Women held the community together. “Wathint’Abafazi Wathint’imbokodo!” was the chant they would rally to during the freedom struggle. “When you strike a woman, you strike a rock.”

The shebeens were unlawful bars in the back of someone’s house.

Whenever the kids in the street saw me they’d yell, “Indola yomlungu!” “The white man!”

As a naughty child, I was well versed in Xhosa threats. Phrases like “Ndiza kubetha entloko.” “I’ll knock you upside the head.”

BORN A CRIME

What I loved:

The humor. While this may seem like a no-brainer, Trevor has not had an easy life, but he manages to weave in humor to balance the struggles. Most of his commentary is heavily sarcastic, because apartheid was just that ridiculous and deserved to be mocked.

The first family were the heirs, so there was always the chance they might get poisoned by the second family. It was like Game of Thrones with poor people.

BORN A CRIME

Which made my prayers the best prayers because English prayers get answered first. How do we know this? Look at white people. Clearly they’re getting through to the right person.

BORN A CRIME

I was so unique people would give directions using me as a landmark. “The house on Makhalima Street. At the corner you’ll see a light-skinned boy. Take a right there.”

BORN A CRIME

The history lessons. At the start of each chapter, Trevor would give a lesson on the state of South Africa. It could be about naming conventions, the insanity of apartheid laws, religious and educational options in South Africa, and how everything came back to racial or linguistic divisions.

Main linguistic and racial divisions in South Africa.

The language connection. As someone that only speaks one language, and probably never will speak another, I am incredibly impressed by Trevor’s polyglot life. Many people in his situation would have simply stuck to English and asserted their status, but Trevor made an effort to learn.

I soon learned that the quickest way to bridge the race gap was through language.

BORN A CRIME

People would hear me speaking Xhosa or Zulu and they’d say, “Wat is jy? ‘n Boesman?” “What are you, a Bushman?” Why are you trying to be black? Why do you speak that click-click language? Look at your light skin. You’re almost there and you’re throwing it away.

BORN A CRIME

The mother/son relationship. For too long, single mothers have been derided as weak and beset by their circumstances. Though this is a memoir about Trevor, the novel really shines when he focuses on his mother, Patricia Nombuyiselo Noah. She was always in charge of her fate and pushed Trevor to be the best version of himself. Of course, they didn’t always get along…

Back and forth we went. I was too confused and angry about getting thrown out of the car to realize what had happened. My mother had saved my life.

BORN A CRIME

Patricia: “Learn from your past and be better because of your past,” she would say, “but don’t cry about your past. Life is full of pain. Let the pain sharpen you, but don’t hold on to it. Don’t be bitter.”

BORN A CRIME

She never let me see us as victims. We were victims, me and my mom, Andrew and Isaac. Victims of apartheid. Victims of abuse. But I was never allowed to think that way, and I didn’t see her life that way.

BORN A CRIME

What I liked:

The coming of age. As a woman that grew up in comfortable suburbia, I was fascinated by Trevor’s many brushes with the law, delinquency, building friendships and navigating cultural minefields. The story my friend specifically pointed out was the dance crew highlighting their main dancer: Hitler. As well, I was tickled by the sections titled “A Young Man’s Long, Awkward, Occasionally Tragic and Frequently Humiliating Education in Affairs of the Heart”. Women will forever remain a mystery to men, right?

…my humiliation had turned into a circus bigger than the event itself: Trevor the undateable clown thought he was going to have the most beautiful girl at the dance, but he’s crashing adn burning so let’s all go outside and watch.

BORN A CRIME

What I could do without:

Once again, nothing! I don’t read many memoirs, but I especially enjoyed this one for its strong honesty mixed with historical context. Trevor didn’t pull any punches and never made an effort to portray himself as the hero. Quite the opposite!

The recommendation:

Comedians are so open and transparent in their acts, so we viewers often think we’re getting the whole story. But a revealing memoir like Born a Crime shows everything we’ve been missing. I ended up crying at the end because I was incredibly moved by the culmination of Trevor’s relationship with his mother. I wasn’t ready to leave this engaging family behind, so I immediately watched You Laugh But It’s True on Netflix.

Read the book, watch the documentary and watch his specials. Does knowing more about the comedian change your opinion of him? Let me know in the comments!

Language saves lives.

They were living through days that—for those who understood what was going on—were dangerous enough to make one’s hair stand on end.

LAST TRAIN TO ISTANBUL

The book:

We’re onto another book brought to you by my KindleUnlimited subscription. This time, while I was on my latest international trip, I got into a World War II historical fiction kind of mood. I was visiting Budapest at the time, and like most European cities, you can really feel the weight of history. Furthermore, I started Last Train to Istanbul (2002) while actually on a train from Budapest to Vienna. I thought it was rather fitting and I read through this book really quickly–it was just that compelling!

Unlike the Spanish of my last book, I do not have even a passing familiarity with the Turkish language. Yes, I’m still back-tracking making my way through Don Quixote, as I read this back in November of 2018.

Spoiler: The main family of this book (Sabiha, Macit, Selva and Rafo) are fictional, but the actions of the Turkish consulate were historically accurate. Ayşe Kulin even interviewed retired Turkish diplomats for her book’s research accuracy.

Amazon Books release cover of Last Train to Istanbul.
The colorful Amazon book cover (2013)

The author:

A native of Istanbul, Ayşe Kulin was listed as Turkey’s top-earning author in 2011. She is also known for the intensive research conducted for each of her novels. More than one of her books have been made into Turkish films. Kulin′s first book “Güneşe Dön Yüzünü” was published in 1984 and adapted into a film. She was awarded by the Turkish Ministry of Culture and Tourism for this film in 1986. Last Train to Istanbul has been translated into 23 languages was is her second English publication.

Translation:

The language train has left the translation station y’all! Originally published in 2002, Nefes Nefese was translated into English in 2006 by John W. Baker. While the book makes complete sense and I was very touched at parts, it is overall a bit stilted and often comical in English. A few other bloggers have suggested reading the original Turkish (because it’s so easy) for more impressive storytelling.

Looking at the pages, it was as if he was listening to the voices of foxes in his mind, but he didn’t say anything.

The government was paying a high price in order to avoid this fire spreading throughout the world.

“Let’s go somewhere with different values that aren’t so extreme. Let’s run away from our families’ emotional blackmail.”

LAST TRAIN TO ISTANBUL

Fittingly, John W. Baker spent his formative years in Istanbul due to his father’s posting with the British government. He’s the first British writer to have written a play in Turkish, Ihitras (Passion) that was published in 2003.

Original Turkish cover from 2002.

What I loved:

The historical context. As I stated previously, the author conducted interviews with actual Turkish diplomats for this novel. In some ways, it was like reading a fascinating textbook with a play thrown in.

The Turkish army needed 11 million bullets and 6,500 machine guns. The British were only prepared to supply two million bullets and 200 machine guns.

LAST TRAIN TO ISTANBUL

Beyazid II’s statement at the time [1492] was: “It is said that Ferdinand is a wise king. However, the truth of the matter is that by getting rid of the Jews, he has made his country poorer and mine richer.”

LAST TRAIN TO ISTANBUL

The religious tolerance. I am an avowed agnostic, but I have a deep respect for those with religious conviction. Since it is nearly impossible to write a WWII novel without mentioning Judaism, I was expecting that focus. However, with the Turkish setting, we were able to gain an Islamic perspective. Selva and Rafo’s relationship shone a light on that separation.

Spoiler: At one point, Macit tries to convince her sister-in-law Selva to persuade her intended Rafo to convert to Islam. However, she states (correctly) that the Jewish religion is passed to children through the mother. But she later contradicts herself by stating that she wouldn’t convert—indeed she observes Ramadan during the novel. This argument is never resolved when it comes to the raising of their son, Fazil. The war probably got in the way…

The language connection. As a blogger covering translated books, I was particularly intrigued by the meta narrative based around learning languages. From the beginning, language acquisition had played a large role in Selva and Sabiha’s lives.

Leman Hanim: “Of course, suitable young men with good educations will be invited to those parties. They all speak several languages and behave impeccably.”

LAST TRAIN TO ISTANBUL

While unemployed in France, Selva taught English, though she longed for her native tongue.

Selva: “What’s wrong with teaching English, Rafo? Is it forbidden to teach?”

Rafo: “No, but it is frobidden to be Jewish.”

LAST TRAIN TO ISTANBUL

Selva: Apart from the few occasions when she spoke to her mother or sister, and of course Rafo, she had no opportunity to speak Turkish to anyone. She hadn’t admitted, even to herself, that she missed using her mother tongue.

LAST TRAIN TO ISTANBUL

With the Turkish consulate’s daring plan to rescue even tangentially Turkish citizens, she now had to teach Turkish to would-be refugees. Though unbeknownst to the consular officers at the start, Selva is going to attempt to smuggle a friend’s grandchildren onto the train by giving them Turkish names and teaching them useful phrases to cover their French origin.

Selva: “Now, I want you to write down these Turkish words together with their meanings, and I expect you to learn them by heart. Ekmek—bread; peynir—cheese; çay—tea; kahve—coffee; gece—night; abla—older sister; abi—older brother; tuvalet—toilet; mutfak—kitchen; oda—room.”

LAST TRAIN TO ISTANBUL

The flashbacks. In order to layout a compelling story, Kulin constructed the familial conflict through a series of flashbacks. We learn about Macit and Sabiha’s courtship, as well as the role it played in allowed Selva and Rafo to fall in love. Beyond the main family’s history, we are given flashbacks into the lives of multiple Jewish families scattered throughout France during the rule of the Vichy regime.

Google maps plot of 2,803 km journey from Paris to Istanbul by car and plane.
Even by modern means, the book’s journey is incredibly long.

What I liked:

The Turkish names. Many times, for English (and especially American) readers, characters names are Anglicized from their native tongue. In this book, the translator kept all of the original and very Turkish names. Some are more easily pronounced by this language-challenged reader than others.

Sabiha, Selva, Macit, Leman Hanim, Hülya, Fazil Reşat Paşa, Tarik and Muhlis. And the two most Turkish names of all: foreign minister Numan Menemencioğlu and President Inŏnü. The more complicated the better!

David Russo’s story. More than halfway through the book, we are introduced to a young man of Jewish and Turkish heritage living a student’s carefree life in Paris. He is summarily arrested and whisked away to a concentration camp because he’s Jewish and he never renewed his Turkish passport. If you’ve seen Schindler’s List you can begin to understand the brutal and harsh efficiency the Nazis deployed during the Holocaust.

What I could do without:

The drama. If you notice the category tags at the top of my blogs, you’ll see “romance” listed today. On Kulin’s Turkish Culture page, Last Train to Istanbul is listed as a romance because of a variety of factors: the flashbacks for Selva and Rafo, Sabiha’s marriage struggles and Tarik’s rocky relationship with Margot. However, despite my previous Goodreads activity in the romance genre, I was less than enchanted with these storylines. They just distracted from the more serious drama of Jews escaping the Nazis.

The recommendation:

I was delighted to find such a simple and yet compelling book to read on my own (much less harrowing) recent train ride. Like my mother before me, I have always been fascinated with the World War II area of history. So much happened in so many places, all in the span of less than a decade (depending on the country you’re following, of course). While Turkey has had more than a few struggles in recent memory, it is still a land of ancient history and culture that I long to visit. I stand by my 4* rating for this book.

Also, let me know in the comments what you think of this Turkish angle on WWII history—did you need the romance and family drama?

Tree of Life Holocaust Memorial visited in Budapest, November 2018.
Tree of Life Holocaust memorial in the Dohány Synagogue, Europe’s largest Synagogue in Budapest, visited in 2018.

Let’s talk it out.

That’s one of therapy’s cruel aspects: the therapist is unique to you, but not the other way around.

TEN WOMEN

The book:

Four books in and we’re finally on a truly translated book! Thank you for sticking by me through this long journey, I know it’s been hard on us all. Which is why we’re all diving into some group therapy down in Chile. Should be a barrel of laughs, y’all. Deemed “psychological fiction”, this story is spread out over ten [long] chapters of each woman telling her story. I’ve never been to group therapy, but this setup was impactful and revealing to me as a bystander. However, I did need almost two full months to finish this book. I didn’t start to enjoy the stories until halfway through, I’m not sure if that’s because they built on each other or I finally sank into the concept.

Before I started this blog, Ten Women (2014) was one of a handful of books I downloaded with my KindleUnlimited subscription as an uncoordinated attempt to read non-American authors. Here’s a secret: I read this book nearly a year ago in April of 2018. While I’m still riding through the older translation that is Don Quixote, I thought I’d review one of the original instigators for this blog.

Spoiler: In case you weren’t keeping track, there are nine women in the therapy session, yet there are ten chapters (like the book title). The final chapter is devoted to the story of Natasha, the therapist that brought them all together.

Simple and elegant

The author:

The daughter of writers, Marcela Serrano is known as one of the most accomplished authors in South America—her debut novel We Loved So Much won Santiago’s Literary Prize in 1994. Most of her stories reflect her own feminism and leftist political leanings. While not all of her novels are set in Chile, one even starred an American protagonist, it wasn’t until this novel was translated that she was exposed to English readers.

Translation:

That’s right, I said translated, people! Originally published in 2011 Diez mujeres was translated into English in 2014 by Beth Fowler. I’ll dig more into the book’s contents here soon, but the translation was impeccable. Growing up in Texas, I know a decent amount of Spanish but this book was entirely in English. There were even some parts I chuckled at, and humor is the most difficult part of speaking another language. (Or so I hear.)

Originally from Inverness, Scotland, Beth Fowler earned her degree in Hispanic Studies from the University of Glasgow, including a year teaching English in Santiago, Chile. A perfect fit for this Chilean powerhouse’s first English translation.

What I loved:

The cynical humor. As a novel entirely set in a group therapy session of downtrodden women, there were many moments of self-reflection and absurdity that sometimes came out as one-liners. Sometimes you’ve got to laugh to keep from crying, eh?

The madwomen, here come the madwomen, the workers on the grounds will be saying, spying on them from behind the trees.

TEN WOMEN

Mané: “Old age is measured by the percentage of the body that bears scrutiny. When you want to cover up yourself completely, you’re screwed.”

TEN WOMEN

Juana: “Susy is submissive like she’s been bitten by a vampire.”

TEN WOMEN

The brutal honesty. In order for therapy to be truly effective, the patients must be fully honest with not only themselves but also their therapist. In the case of Ten Women, that honesty carries a greater weight when exposed to a group of strangers.

The female perspective. Similar to many Latin and South American countries, Chile has a history of machismo culture. Marcela Serrano has a tradition of showcasing strong women and her own feminist ideals in her work. These ten women have all had struggles and setbacks, yet they all managed some small triumphs along the way, in the face of it all.

Long and narrow is Chile

What I liked:

The wide variety. As a feminist, I’d like to think that equality for all really means that: all. Ten Women covers the young and old, rich and poor, well-educated and illiterate. Feminism isn’t socialism, but rather providing everyone opportunities and support to make their own way. At least, that’s what I think.

Mané: “Because despite everything, I was always insecure, like all women.”

TEN WOMEN

What I could do without:

The pace. As I mentioned at the start, this book took me over two months to finish. Unlike a tv version of group therapy (Go On anyone?) these chapters are unbroken by interruption or deviation. It’s simply one woman telling her life story and what led her to therapy. I really shouldn’t have been surprised, but I really thought there would be more drama or hijinks involved.

The lack of dialogue. Similar to my first reviewed book, Chemistry, there are no quotation marks for dialogue in Ten Women. Unfortunately, this style choice makes this already detailed book plod on even slower as you have to pay very close attention.

The length. Each woman’s chapter was over 20 pages, the longest came in at 30 pages. With no dialogue and only the very occasional poem or song, that’s a long time to stay on one person’s life story. Part of that distance may have come from the international differences, as well as some of their ages, but I still persevered.

The recommendation:

Read an excerpt and the reviews of someone that loved this book before reading. It is a bit of a commitment, but many people enjoy simple stories of daily life. However, I use books as an escape and prefer stories that really stand out for the characters, situation or setting. I originally gave this book a 4/5, but I’m leaning more toward 3 now. Many of the money and political challenges of Chile (as well as living in a large city like Santiago) mystified me and didn’t allow me to connect with the women like I should have to enjoy the story.

Also, let me know in the comments if this book would make you want to travel to Chile or not!

Book before movie. Always.

“You’re the only Chinese mother I know who’s actually encouraging her daughter to shack up with a guy.”

“I’m the only Chinese mother with an unmarried daughter who’s almost thirty!”

CRAZY RICH ASIANS

The book:

Readers, I committed an error against book lovers: I watched the movie before reading the book. To be fair, I was trying to support diverse movie casts and heard the movie was excellent (it was). Oh, and I was waiting to receive the book for Christmas (I did)…which somehow prevented me from also checking it out from the library.

Moving past my shame, Crazy Rich Asians (2013) lived up to all of the hype and then some! If all debut novels were this good then the whole world would have as many authors as Iceland. While I’m deep in the slow Spanish past with Don Quixote, I breezed through the modern rom com of high fashion and luxury that is Singapore. However, at 527 pages, this is the longest book I’ve read for this blog (starting strong!) and the first one in a series. Maybe I’ll cover the whole series…maybe I won’t. Stick around!

Cover of Crazy Rich Asians
Non-movie covers are best.

The author:

As I mentioned above, this is Kevin Kwan’s first novel, and it is NOT autobiographical! I promised in my last post that all my books would not be such, and here I am already following through. For while Kwan was born and raised in Singapore (and have an affinity for fine jewelry), the comparison to his characters ends there. He earned a degree in creative writing and then moved into a successful design career.

No illustrious and fabulously wealthy family dynasty or tragic love affairs for Mr. Kwan. That we know of….

Translation:

No. This time for a good reason: one of the four official languages of Singapore is English! However, Kevin Kwan liberally flavored his novel with naturally used non-English. One of the most delightful parts of reading this book was the extra humor from the footnotes.

Throughout the novel characters use phrases such as Malay (Alamak=oh dear or oh my god!), Hokkien (sah kah=rude hand gesture), and Cantonese (hei mai=isn’t that right?) among other slang and region-specific words. This really helped me feel like I was getting an authentic experience, as well as learning on the go.

What I loved:

The alternating perspectives. It’s very easy to write a “forbidden romance” from simply the lovebirds’ angle, broadly painting the parents as villains. Kwan went deeper into the parents’ (okay, Eleanor’s) psyche and showing their everyday lives and the pressures inherent to their status. While I am a sucker for love (as an unmarried woman nearing thirty), I also understand family obligation and career aspirations. Practicality can lead to happiness.

Rachel: “This surprise invitation, however, sparked some vestigial instinct within her. The long-dormant romantic in her was awakening…”

CRAZY RICH ASIANS

Eleanor “This girl is obviously a cunning, deceitful GOLD DIGGER! You know as well as I do that your son can never marry someone like that.”

CRAZY RICH ASIANS

The family tree. This may seem simple, but I’ve always been a huge fan of reader tools. If you create a new fantasy world, give me a map. If you create your own language, give me a guide (or footnotes). If your novel is based on a convoluted, multi-generational and multinational family, then give me a family tree. Similar to his footnotes, Kwan’s family tree addendums made me chuckle. I flipped back to this chart for reference (and giggles) at least twice every time I sat down to read.

The colorful characters. Kwan intended his novel to be a satire of the extravagant lifestyles and deep-seated prejudices of the families that left China to prosper in Southeast Asia. Peik Lin’s extravagant generosity, the dual psalm and stock trading Bible Study, Radio One Asia (see “family tree”), and even Astrid’s shopping trips. Rachel and Nick could pale by comparison, but Kwan sets them up to be refreshingly simple and original.

Spoiler: After being married in Asia’s wedding of the century, I laughed at Araminta’s incredible pettiness to be annoyed by Astrid’s inadequate fashion choice.

Take a minute. Revel in the Lion City’s glory.

The relationship struggles. I’ve been in a relationship for over five years now and I still remember the near-panic attack I had when my boyfriend casually suggested I meet his parents (over Thanksgiving I might add). I even baked two different types of brownies to put my best foot forward. Rachel and Nick both take many opportunities to discuss their trials with friends, family and eventually each other. Neither is perfect, but both care.

Spoiler: Nothing Rachel did was enough for Nick’s relatives (except probably Astrid and his father), and he was bluntly told not to marry her.

What I liked:

The brand names. I’ll readily admit that I had to Google many of the luxury brand names sprinkled liberally throughout Crazy Rich Asians. However, the variety showed a good depth of research and I appreciated that attention to detail.

Spoiler: During Astrid’s most interesting flashback, it was a nice twist that her boyfriend introduced her to haute couture and living the high life. Way to break stereotypes, Kwan!

What I could do without:

Nothing. Honestly, I enjoyed every bit of this book and can’t think of anything I would change! It’s an international bestseller that made $238 million in the US alone while maintaining a 91% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Kevin Kwan gave the movie studios an incredible foundational product.

Spoiler: I’m very glad this book ended without a solid resolution of Nick & Rachel’s relationship. The pain was still too raw for Rachel and it would’ve been jarring and unrealistic for her to fully forgive him so soon. The food argument was much better.

The recommendation:

Read the book and then re-watch the movie. This is a very enjoyable read that presents a simple premise against a backdrop of magnificent excess. Meeting the parents is an ordeal that every couple has to undergo, some people just get to travel on private jets and attend man-made island receptions. Life isn’t fair, I know.

Also, let me know in the comments what you think of the differences between the book and movie!

Never stop running.

“I laughed. Partly at the joke, partly at how Afghan humor never changed. Wars were raged, the Internet was invented, and a robot had rolled on the surface of Mars, and in Afghanistan we were still telling Mullah Nasruddin jokes.”

The Kite Runner

The book:

My first book review was of one I had previously read, by an author with the heritage of a country I had visited, and visited recently. This was my first time reading The Kite Runner (2003), and sadly, I will probably never visit Afghanistan. While many events have changed the status quo in Khaled Hosseini’s homeland in the 16 years since his first novel was published, not enough has changed in the region for casual tourism.

2005 paperback cover of The Kite Runner book.
The 2005 version I was given, with a Readers Guide at the end.

As an internationally bestselling novel, even casual readers have heard of The Kite Runner and its heart-wrenching story of a boy’s journey throughout and away from Afghanistan. Due to its notoriety, I’m going to be more free with spoilers than before. This was not an easy book to read, but I’m very glad this blog project compelled me to read it, finally.

The author:

From what I’ve read, Khaled Hosseini will spend the rest of his life denying claims that his debut novel is in any way autobiographical. Yes, he did grow up in Kabul—even in the Wazir Akbar Khan neighborhood from the book. His family was able to leave Afghanistan before the Soviet and Taliban regimes decimated it, and he settled in California at 15. Both of his parents immigrated with him and he has two children, all characteristics that differ from the protagonist, Amir.

I promise this blog will not solely concentrate on falsely-autobiographical books. Though, you have to admit, these authors each paint vivid stories in their own way when given creative license to…improvise.

Translation:

No. Khaled Hosseini wrote The Kite Runner in English, but he did not speak the language himself until he was 15. However, I was delightedly frustrated by the many Farsi words sprinkled throughout the book. From family titles (Baba=Father) to greetings (Salaam alaykum=Peace be unto you) the language of Afghanistan was sometimes explained but often left untranslated. In a small way, that solidified the story for me.

As well, I will readily admit that I had not known that Farsi (or Dari) was the national language of Afghanistan. Like many, I assumed it was Arabic. This misunderstanding brings an even greater contrast to the later religious domination of the country.

What I loved:

The adult perspective. From the very beginning, the reader is told that this is a story of remembrance, redemption, and regret. Every childhood moment is framed with adult hindsight and a little history. For too many Americans (myself included), Afghanistan is a country overrun by the Taliban, shackled to strict religious doctrine with a harsh climate. The author—and his narrator—gave the perspective of both a comfortable native and a tourist returning to a changed home.

The brutal honesty. While Hosseini was in the midst of writing his novel, planes struck the Twin Towers on 9/11. Suddenly the world’s attention was fixed on Afghanistan and Islam. He could have chosen to take the easy route and painted his homeland in a glowing light of ancient tradition and misguided morals. Instead, he presented a land of contradictions:

“‘We Afghans are prone to a considerable degree of exaggeration…'”

The Kite Runner

“‘We’re a melancholic people, we Afghans, aren’t we?'”

The Kite Runner

As I mentioned at the start of this review, The Kite Runner is not an easy book to read as rape and murder feature strongly. I believe that is entirely necessary: Afghanistan was not an easy country to live in, especially in Amir’s situation. Privileged he may have been, but his life was based on a lie. Amir’s Pashtun ethnicity forever set him above Hassan’s Hazara ancestry, though they were secretly half-brothers. Would knowing the truth have improved how Amir treated his closest companion? Honestly, I think he would have pitied him, and that would have lead to spite. Amir was not an easy character to like, making his redemption all the more important.

The weight of history. As an American, I was often taught that we are the oldest democracy (debatable), even though we have less than 300 years of history to our name. In contrast, the history of Kabul can be traced to the 7th century, and even modern Afghanistan predates the USA. Hosseini skillfully wove in ethnic, political, religious and gender struggles throughout an inherently simple story of brotherly competition.

Map showing Kabul and Afghanistan surrounded by other Asian nations.
Map of Kabul’s location within the larger Asian region.

What I liked:

The cast of characters. With Amir as the first-person narrator, we are mostly confined to his POV. However, since he originates from a narrative-based culture, he is told many stories throughout his childhood. Stories of his father, his half-brother Hassan, his country and his mother all feed into his eventual career as a writer. I particularly enjoyed the father’s story arc from distant patriarch to fellow immigrant and finally familial confidant. The revelation of his so-called sin and subsequent guilt defined nearly every other character, not just Amir.

The kites. Personally, I’ve never been a big fan of metaphors. But I do think the kites were an allegory for the antagonistic nature of Afghanistan, while also serving as a bridge between the brothers. Hosseini did a nice job of framing the novel with kite running, while also resisting the urge to beat us over the head with the imagery.

The pacing. Amir’s reminiscence begins as a child in 1960s Kabul and we follow him until after his return from Afghanistan in 2002, post-9/11. Hosseini does a good job of focusing on important details to build his theme, while employing backtracking to fill in transitory holes later.

What I could do without:

Hassan’s passive characterization. I understand that this is Amir’s story, but even when Hassan is given a voice in Part III, he is saintly. He blindly supports Amir his entire life, maintains there is good in everyone and never defends himself. Even Amir’s wife Soraya, one of the neglected classes of Afghanistan, is given more dimension in her more brief scenes.

The recommendation:

Consume this book. Though not an in-depth history of Afghanistan or its conflicts, The Kite Runner does a splendid job of bringing humanity and depth to this often forgotten or derided nation. Hopefully, like myself, reading this book will drive you to do more independent research on Afghanistan. Too many people fear what they do not understand, here’s a chance to rise above that fear. Comment your perceptions of or questions about this book below!

Oh, did I mention there’s a movie, too?

10 years ago…

Now that we’re more than a week into 2019, it struck me that it has now been a decade since I first traveled overseas to Europe.

A decade.

I know it’s hard to believe looking at my author photo, but I’m just 27. When I fully remember events that happened over a decade ago, it still stuns me.

Another aspect of this memory that astounds me, besides this picture below, is the abundant curiosity that my high-school-graduate self showed during her first overseas excursion: I took 256 pictures during a 3 day trip to England alone.

Chelsea smiling in front of Windsor Castle wearing a gray polo.
In full 2009 Windsor Tourist Mode.

Just two months ago I visited three countries and took 100 fewer pictures in three times the length of time. Maturity, y’all.

I’m writing about this first trip to Europe to demonstrate one of the main goals of my blog: diving deep into cultural differences and similarities. The first country we visited was England. The saying goes that the US and England are two countries divided by a common language. However, the disparity that struck me the most was the weight of history that the English contend with on a daily basis.

In the US, we consider anything over 100 years as quite, quite old. The British would just consider it quite seasoned. (More on those common language divisions here!) While walking around London I was just as likely to see the remains of a bombed-out WW11 church as I was a 16th-century theater—architectural culture shock.

Literature is one of the ways in which people dissect current events through historical and fantastical framing. Even though some of the books I’ll review will be in English, the cultural setting of the story and author necessitate their own form of translation.

Just as my teenage self was open-minded about every single aspect of traveling 4, 837 miles away from home to visit a country that abuses the letter “u”, so will this blog be acceptant of viewpoints and experiences from globally diverse perspectives.

Ferry water trail through the English Channel on a clear day.
The world is our oyster and the horizon is endless…

Do you have any stories of your first trip abroad, or first experience of culture shock? Share in the comments below!

This isn’t a textbook

“I realize what a hypocrite I’m being, to make him wait for an answer while dwelling on a twenty-five minute line.”

Chemistry

I have a secret for you, dear readers, this is not the first time I’ve read Chemistry (2017) by Weike Wang. It was the first time I’d read it in one night, which I took as a very, very good sign. While I promise that this is most definitely not a BuzzFeed-sponsored blog, I do have the site’s Books Newsletter to thank for introducing me to what is becoming one of my favorite books.

Chemistry book cover
This cover doesn’t not look like a textbook.

Narrated by an unnamed woman (strangely, I never named her), Chemistry follows along as this woman falls into the middle of multiple crossroads. Should she continue her chemistry PhD? Should she marry her incredibly patient live-in boyfriend, Eric? Will she ever stop drinking wine?

The writer: Since this is a blog about reading books by non-American authors, here’s a little background on Weike Wang. Her family moved to the US from China when she was 5 and she later attended Harvard. While these characteristics are very similar to our narrator, Wang has made it clear that this is not an autobiography, but rather contemporary fiction.

The strained, often stereotypical, relationship the narrator has with her immigrant Chinese parents was drawn from multiple instances, as well as her own.

Translation: No. Weike Wang wrote Chemistry in English, but many aspects of being Chinese, such as navigating many dialects and the immigrant experience, are threaded throughout this book.

What I loved: The short bursts of thought and activity that the narrator conveys. Both times I’ve read Chemistry I was surprised how easily and deeply I connected with this narrator, despite her seemingly shallow communication style.

The ability to make mistakes. Too many protagonists always know what to say and how to win the day—our narrator is barely in the room! I loved that she made jokes at inappropriate times, wasted entire days watching TV for no reason and didn’t stick to a path just because it was laid out. Bravery.

China! I discovered this book barely a month after I returned from traveling to China. This was my first trip to Asia and I was fascinated by the vibrantly ancient culture. The narrator mentions Shanghai and I just so happen to have a related picture.

Chelsea on a ferry in Shanghai, China in 2017
The most amazing part of this picture is the lack of people pushing near me.

What I liked: The dog. On my second reading, I had my new puppy lying across my lap. I was now tickled reading about the misadventures of the narrator and her dog as her world is otherwise in upheaval.

The scientific facts. My last science class was nearly 7 years ago—though Life 1002 barely merits that descriptor. However, I have always loved learning and the author did a good job of inserting these bits of trivia throughout the story.

What I could do without: The undergraduate. I understand building conflict, but this is my review and I make the calls. Eric was such a strong force in the narrator’s journey, that this new entrant should barely make a dent. No matter what the best friend wants to happen.

This book is only 244 pages and is broken up into easily digested chunks for the ADD age. I promise not to judge you if it takes you longer than a night to finish. Also, if you happen to know more about the subject of chemistry than how to spell it, I would particularly enjoy your opinion on this book, so comment below!

Thank you for starting this journey with me, where in the world will we visit next?